Friday, November 17, 2017

South Toms River 11/17--New Wawa

Dover Road, South Toms River.
Ever since we moved here, Shari & I always said that the Exit 80 off the Parkway would be a perfect place for a Wawa. There was a vacant lot right on the corner of Railroad Avenue and Dover Road and nowhere to buy coffee unless you count 7/11 which we don't. Evidently, the Wawa corporation agreed, because in April a "Coming Soon" sign went up. All the spring, summer, and into the fall, I tracked the progress the store, snapping an iPhone picture through the car window whenever I could:
May
June
July
August
September
"Soon" came today, when Shari texted me this picture:

She also sent me a self a "Ha-ha-ha" selfie, since she got in there first.
They opened at 5 AM today--had I known, I would have been first in line. When I got her text, I was about 3/4 of the way around the Manasquan Reservoir--this was almost as bad as hearing about a rare bird except that I was reasonably certain that the Wawa would be there when I got to it. But to get to it I had to take long way around, going east on I-195 and then south down the Parkway, probably about 25 miles out of my way. However, they were giving out free coffee.

This is the 83rd Wawa I have visited, encompassing 4 states: NJ, DE, PA, & FL. To see the others you can click here.

This is a pretty important one for us--it will change the way we go home driving south on the Parkway. No longer will we exit at 89 and put up with the traffic lights on Rt 70 so we stop at the Wawa on Vermont Avenue in Lakewood. Instead, we'll just cruise down to Exit 80 and swing around Rt 530 to Whiting, the original route we took when we first came to view the area 6 1/2 years ago.

There are a couple of other spots that could use a Wawa--the NE corner of the Wildlife Drive at Brig comes to mind--but I think that is unlikely.

As a memento of the new store I asked for a receipt--had to buy something since the coffee was free--and, naturally, I found a typo. The store is actually located in SOUTH
Toms River, a town distinct from the much larger one just to the north.

But I doubt anyone else will ever read their receipt beyond the numerals or care where they really are.

And so, after 6 1/2 years, a dream has finally taken on reality.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Manahawkin WMA 11/15--Ring-necked Pheasant, New But Not Countable

It gets hard in the cold months to find a place to walk in the woods or fields--the parks are full of dog walkers and the WMAs resound with gunfire. I wear orange from October to March. Colliers Mills on a weekday is the "Wild West" as a hunter at Manahawkin WMA told me today. I know that and won't walk there most of the fall and winter. Manahawkin seemed like a good alternative--it has impoundments as well as fields and woods. I didn't think it was heavily hunted, but I was mistaken.

When I saw 2 Ring-necked Pheasants (a male and a hen) on the side of Stafford Avenue, just before the trail into the WMA, I knew they weren't countable for my eBird list but they are beautiful and, if you're in a car, very approachable. As I drove along slowly they paid me no heed and I could take pictures practically leaning out the car window. As soon as I got out of the car, off they both flew.

I ran into a couple of hunters, one on the dike between impoundments and one with a dog at the entrance on Hilliard Avenue. They were both friendly and didn't care that I was birding. Neither was having much luck. One told me that pheasants are stocked there Tuesdays and Thursdays and he avoids the place then because there is too much shooting! I was surprised that the state continuously stocked the woods with fresh birds. I thought they dumped a flock of birds at one time and let the hunters have at it over the course the season.

I wasn't have much luck myself. The impoundments didn't have many ducks or other waterfowl and while there were flurries of birds in a couple of spots, there were long stretches where I didn't even hear a chip note. I did flush a hen and heard a male calling very close to me but invisible in the thick brush.

A few years ago, in the back impoundment, there was a Black-necked Stilt, so I, superstitiously, think of that water as a rarity site. Today, the rarest birds in there were Greater Yellowlegs.

I stopped at one point on Stafford where there are some dead trees, remembering that Mike & Pete & I have seen Red-tailed Hawk in the vicinity. And sure enough, as I was scanning, there was a hawk, right where they like to be.

After walking back out the way I came (there is probably a loop I can make, but I worry about getting lost there), I did a little survey of The Bridge to Nowhere (which is contiguous with Manahawkin). Aside from some Great Blue Herons, a cormorant incongruously sitting atop a utility pole, and about 200 Boat-tailed Grackles, there wasn't anything worth noting.
The little list from Manahawkin:
17 species
Mute Swan 5
Mallard 8
Green-winged Teal 25
Great Blue Heron 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Greater Yellowlegs 8
Ring-billed Gull 2
Herring Gull 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 Heard
Blue Jay 2 Heard
Carolina Chickadee 5
Tufted Titmouse 1 Heard
Eastern Bluebird 4
American Robin 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 3
White-throated Sparrow 2 Heard

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

700 Great Bay Blvd 11/14

I went down to Great Bay Blvd in Tuckerton this morning, more for the exercise than for the birds--I didn't expect to find anything new, but you can build up a pretty good list with a combination of stopping at certain spots, walking the beach and then walking from the inlet up to the first wooden bridge and back.

Crazy Mockingbird
My most interesting experiences were all around 700 Great Bay Blvd, which is just north of the second wooden bridge. This is the fenced off area with the mysterious beeping, solar-powered machinery. I usually stop here to check the boat launch mud flats and also to check for sparrows. Today, the entertainment was provided by a young mockingbird, who landed on my side view mirror (and crapped all over it) and then continuously attacked its image in the mirror and in the side window.

I'd seen this behavior before at this spot about a month ago, probably with the same bird, but it was attacking (and despoiling) my car. I first noticed it when I was looking out on the bay--I heard some scrabbling sounds coming from behind me, but didn't pay it much attention until I found the bird perched on my car. When I put my scope back in the car it flew off. However, that other bird was really bothering it, so as I walked toward the bridge to look for sparrows, it returned and really gave its image a walloping. Actually, it occurred to me that the bird may have thought it was in a gang fight, since it was attacking both the image in the mirror and the image in the window. I know turkeys will attack their images in shiny metal on cars, but I don't think of mockingbirds as being as stupid as turkeys.

700 Great Bay Boulevard
Perhaps the incessant beeping coming from behind the fence drove the mocker mad!

Black-crowned Night-Heron
On my walk north, I saw two guys inside the fence with clipboards and devices, so I asked them, what exactly they were monitoring here for the last 4 or 5 years. It turns out the whole apparatus is a wind monitor that works on sonar--the little beep is sending up a sound that measures the winds and is recorded by the machinery below. The constant beeping is"Why we don't put it near houses," one of the guys said. Seems like a lot of work just to get wind speed and direction in a remote area of Ocean County. Suspicions arise. But at least I know what the whole set up is for--if they were telling me true.

On my way back, I stopped in by the boat launch again--as the tides are ever-moving, so are the birds, so it is always worth a second or third look, which is why I saw this juvenile Night-Heron. My first reaction was that it was a Yellow-crowned, because the bill is big, thick and all black. But Yellow-crowned is rare this time of year, so even though I don't see any yellow on the bill, nor do I find any big white spots on the coverts, I'm listing it as a Black-crowned Night-Heron because it a) has some blurry lines on the breast, b) looks more squat (its tail comes almost to the ground where a Yellow-crowned would have a longer-legged look), and c) is expected. But I'm not entirely convinced. Just when I think I have these birds down cold, an example shows up that confounds me. (UPDATE: After consultation with my panel of experts, it is indeed a Black-crowned Night-Heron.)

For my efforts today I managed 25 species along the boulevard (plus a couple of duck species in Holly Lake and a few more waterfowl (geese, swans, Gadwalls, a Pied-billed Grebe) at Tip Seaman Park). The GBB list:
Brant 54
American Black Duck 11
Bufflehead 33
Red-throated Loon 1
Common Loon 1
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 5
Great Egret 20
Snowy Egret 2
Black-crowned Night-Heron 1
Northern Harrier 1
American Oystercatcher 2
Black-bellied Plover 13
Dunlin 305
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Herring Gull 100
Great Black-backed Gull 2
Mourning Dove 4
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 300
Yellow-rumped Warbler 7
White-throated Sparrow 2
Song Sparrow 3
Red-winged Blackbird 3
Boat-tailed Grackle 150

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Fun with Hazmat

The container after the discharge was halted
If I hadn't said, "This drives me crazy," I wouldn't have spent nearly 3 hours at Colliers Mills with Mike waiting to show DEP Emergency Response where we found a leaking container of gasoline.

Mike & I were at Colliers Mills after spending a fairly productive morning at Assunpink WMA, scanning the lake and walking the dirt road. The first bird I listed today was a Great Horned Owl that Mike showed me as we sped along I-195, roosting in a tree, where he had seen it for most of the last week as he drove into work. Not a bad start for the morning.

The second significant listing of the day was three Trumpeter Swans on Lake Assunpink, presumably the same three birds that have wintered there for the previous three years. One had been reported yesterday, but the trio wasn't especially surprising to find. We spent a little time debating whether they were actually Tundra Swans, but size, bill and neck shape led us to Trumpeter. These birds are somewhat controversial in NJ, since their provenance is unknown, but they don't seem to be of the re-introduced population from New York. And since they have become regular winter visitors, they have been ruled "countable." Mike and I had one much earlier in the year, but this time of year (when nothing much is new and most birds pale before our African list), anything unusual, even if it isn't a 
year bird, piques our interest. 

We didn't have many raptors at Assunpink though the Osprey was late, the Northern Harrier always fun to see and there were a couple of Bald Eagles harassing the ducks. A guy in white car stopped us and asked us where he could photograph eagles--I mumbled under my breath, "I'm sorry, but you can't ask us that, you're not in a pickup truck," but Mike was polite and helpful. 

After Assunpink we made a quick pass through Mercer Corporate Park, home of the rarities, which was home to nothing but a few geese, pigeons and a Red-tailed Hawk. We decided to go down to Colliers Mills. No hunting on Sundays. No hunting, but plenty of guys running their dogs, a Jeep club called "Jeepers Creepers" speeding up and down Success Road, and ATVs and dirt bikes running illegally through the fields, not to mention the aimless wanderings of people out for a Sunday drive--"I wonder what's up this road--oh nothing, well, let's turn around then." 

So we were walking north up the east side of Colliers Mills Lake, heading for the power line cut where I thought it might be quieter and more birdy (though we had already scored a Field Sparrow close to the parking lot--hadn't see one of those in a couple of months) when I saw the big green container pictured above. People dumping stuff in parks and WMAs--"This drives me crazy." I went over to the container, figuring I'd pick it up later on the way back, when I saw that it was leaking. The side said VP Racing Fuel and the liquid smelled like gasoline. The area around the can was stained. There was still a good amount of liquid inside. 

Mike has worked in site remediation for DEP for 30 something years, so he sprang into action, turning the open end uphill to stop the dripping, only to find that the container was cracked at the bottom and was leaking from there too. So he turned the container over 180 degrees and halted the discharge. Then he called WARN-DEP, and reported the incident. 

I figured that was the end of it and that nothing more would happen--and maybe if I had reported it that would be true, but I guess an employee of DEP has a certain amount of gravitas. Anyway, Mike said we should wait. They were going to send both an enforcement officer to relieve him and someone qualified to handle the hazardous material. 

As I had no place else to go and the weather was pleasant I didn't much mind, but after a while staring at a no longer leaking container of gasoline gets a little old, so we walked back to the intersection at Success where we watched the passing parade of fools--including one dolt in a pickup full of ATVs who asked where he could run his machines. We weren't very sympathetic to his plight. Meanwhile, even though Mike had told the dispatcher at DEP that we were on the east side of Colliers Mills Lake, she wrote down Colliers Mills, lake, east side, so the enforcement officer went to Lake Success, 5 miles away, explaining to Mike on the phone that that's where 90% of the incidents take place anyway. Then she was delayed because she had to pull someone out of the sand near the lake. Then she was delayed because she was involved in chasing down the ATVers and dirt bikers. 

At the intersection, while all this excitement was being relayed to us, I remembered that I had smelled gas when we started up the road. I thought it was coming from a noisy pickup truck that was driving behind us, but now we saw a hose on the side of the road we had previously overlooked, along with a lozenge shaped stain in the middle of the dirt road.
With this forensic evidence, we played a little environmental detective: the container originally fell off a vehicle here, cracked at the bottom, started to leak. The perpetrator picked up the leaking container, transported it a couple of hundred yards north up the road, and flung to the side where it would be less likely to be found--but not that less likely. Which is why I started to smell gasoline long before we found the container. 

By now, close to 3 hours had passed, the Jeeper Creepers were congregating at the parking lot, asking each other if they had gotten a ticket, cars, SUVs, and truck were streaming west down Success Road out of the WMA as if in a panic, and, at the same time both a DEP enforcement officer (but not the one we were waiting for) and the Emergency Response Vehicle pulled up. The officer was chasing the off-roaders. He'd caught one but wanted the others. We couldn't really help him with their whereabouts--the only ones we'd seen had already escaped to the west with their machines loaded on the back of trucks. There was also a vehicle on fire somewhere in the WMA just to add to the chaos. 

The emergency responder drove up the road and Mike and I watched him test the site--high concentration of gasoline, big surprise, and stabilize the container with what were essentially wee-wee pads for hazmat. He was going to dig up some of the contaminated sand around the container as well as the lozenge stain down the road and take the hose away too. It was way too late to continue birding, so we took our little list of 18 species and called it a day, happy, sort of, that we had done our little bit for the environment, though the 10 off-roaders still ripping through the fields was as depressing as can be. I must say I was surprised that DEP would come out and clean up so quickly a few gallons of gasoline on a Sunday. Your tax dollars at work and thanks. 

I've picked up and disposed of some big crap at Colliers Mills--a refrigerator box once, a portfolio full of bills and receipts, a hub cap, not to mention about 20 skeets that escaped the shot gun...but this was the first time I needed reinforcements. 

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Avalon Seawatch 11/7--White-winged Scoter, Parasitic Jaeger

Long periods of this punctuated by flights of silhouettes
Mike & I went down to the Avalon Seawatch in Cape May County today, hoping for a couple of year birds, which we got. Today's weather was borderline dreary and it still hasn't penetrated my head that I have to wear warmer clothes--probably should have worn a knit cap instead of my Ding Darling baseball cap with a hole in its crown--so with the northerly wind it was a little uncomfortable standing still looking at the occasional long line of Black Scoters fly by.  My "count" of 950 is laughably arbitrary. I admire the official counter for his attempt at accuracy--yesterday he tallied 2638 Black Scoters going north to south. 

As to the year birds--the first was a Parasitic Jaeger we saw in typical fashion: a large dark, distant bird skipping along the top of the breakers, chasing a gull. We knew it was a Jaeger because it wasn't a gull (and the seawatcher got it in his scope) but that's the best I can say for it. 

Somehow, both Mike & I were still missing White-winged Scoter, the least numerous of the 3 regularly appearing scoters. Many scoter silhouettes flew by at speed (the north wind giving them a boost), but it was until we had been standing there for an hour that 5 scoters with obvious white wing patches flew by. With that we figured we'd had enough. I also admire the counter for his endurance--to stand every day as the weather gets colder and gloomier (it rained the last half of today) counting thousands of ducks and distinguishing which was are Black Scoters from which ones are Surf Scoters, with the occasional merganser, teal, long-tail, or even Wood Duck thrown in, (and for negligible remuneration) is quite a feat of persistence and dedication. It sure doesn't look like fun.

There were a few ducks I couldn't get on due to distance, speed, and poor eyesight, while the Green-winged Teal, even though I did see 3 smaller ducks mixed in with the scoters, are definitely "if you say so" birds. My list came out to 15. The birds I enjoyed the most were the gannets, plunge diving into the ocean and brilliant white against the ever darkening skies.

Brant 23
Green-winged Teal 3
White-winged Scoter 5
Black Scoter 950
Red-breasted Merganser 1

Red-throated Loon 1
Common Loon 1
Northern Gannet 10
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Sanderling 7
Parasitic Jaeger 1
Bonaparte's Gull 1
Ring-billed Gull 1
Herring Gull 5
Great Black-backed Gull 1

Sunday, October 29, 2017

South Africa: Index and Trip List

COMMON OSTRICH, Wakkerstroom
Why just yesterday, I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he got in my pajamas I'll never know.
                          --Groucho Marx

On October 10, Mike & I left for South Africa for a birding trip of eastern part of the country, including 5 nights at Kruger National Park, guided by our friend, Kim Risen of NatureScape Tours. Shari had already been in the country for a couple of weeks, participating in the pre-tour around Cape Town. We all met up in Durban and traveled in a zig-zag manner north to Kruger.

The emphasis, of course, was on birds, but many mammals (and even a few snails, lizards, insects and wild melons) were seen at our various stops. The entries are organized in larger blocks than usual because the number of life birds this trip was overwhelming. In around 20 years of listing I have compiled a US life list of 545 species. In just under 2 weeks in South Africa, I saw/heard 324 species, of which 294 were life birds.

It was a good but exhausting trip--every day was like doing a World Series of Birding--we'd start at 5:30 AM and often go until 10 PM with night drives. But then, how many times am I going to be in South Africa?

Protea Hotel, Johannesburg
Eshowe & Dlinza Forest
St. Lucia & iSimagaliso Wetland Park
Warning Signs
Mkhuze Game Reserve
Wakkerstroom
The Adventures of the Wawa Cups
Kruger NP 10/20-10/21
The Big Five (+ One)
Kruger NP 10/22-10/24
Gallery

Trip List: Key: LIFE BIRD, Year Bird, Rarity
COMMON OSTRICH   Teza
WHITE-FACED WHISTLING-DUCK   Mkhuze Game Reserve
COMB DUCK   Kruger NP
Egyptian Goose   iSimangaliso
SOUTH AFRICAN SHELDUCK   Wakkerstroom
SPUR-WINGED GOOSE   St. Lucia
GARGANEY   St. Lucia
HOTTENTOT TEAL   St. Lucia
CAPE SHOVELER   Wakkerstrom Wetland Reserve
YELLOW-BILLED DUCK   St. Lucia
RED-BILLED DUCK   St. Lucia
Helmeted Guineafowl   iSimangaliso
CRESTED GUINEAFOWL   Ndiza Inn, St Lucia
NATAL FRANCOLIN   Kruger NP
SWAINSON'S FRANCOLIN   Eastvaal District Council
RED-NECKED FRANCOLIN   Eastvaal District Council
CRESTED FRANCOLIN   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RED-WINGED FRANCOLIN   Wakkerstroom
LITTLE GREBE   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
Greater Flamingo   Ermelo
AFRICAN OPENBILL   Kruger NP NP
WOOLLY-NECKED STORK   Eshowe
SADDLE-BILLED STORK   Mkhuze Game Reserve
MARABOU STORK   Kruger NP
YELLOW-BILLED STORK   St. Lucia
LONG-TAILED CORMORANT   iSimangaliso
AFRICAN DARTER   St. Lucia
PINK-BACKED PELICAN   St. Lucia
HAMERKOP   Kruger NP
LITTLE BITTERN   Mkhuze Game Reserve
Gray Heron   iSimangaliso
BLACK-HEADED HERON   Ndiza Inn, St Lucia
GOLIATH HERON   Mkhuze Game Reserve
PURPLE HERON   Mkhuze Game Reserve
Great Egret   iSimangaliso
INTERMEDIATE EGRET   St. Lucia estuary
Little Egret   iSimangaliso
Cattle Egret   Protea Hotel
Squacco Heron   Mkhuze Game Reserve
Striated Heron   Kruger NP
Black-crowned Night-Heron   Wakkerstrom Wetland Reserve
Glossy Ibis   Protea Hotel
Sacred Ibis   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SOUTHERN BALD IBIS   Mpumalanga
HADADA IBIS   Protea Hotel
AFRICAN SPOONBILL   St. Lucia
SECRETARYBIRD   Wakkerstroom
Osprey   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BLACK-SHOULDERED KITE   Wakkerstroom
PALM-NUT VULTURE   Umalazi
WHITE-HEADED VULTURE   Kruger NP
LAPPET-FACED VULTURE   Kruger NP
HOODED VULTURE   Kruger NP
WHITE-BACKED VULTURE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
CAPE GRIFFON   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BATELEUR   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BLACK-BREASTED SNAKE-EAGLE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BROWN SNAKE-EAGLE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
FASCIATED SNAKE-EAGLE   Ndiza Inn, St Lucia
MARTIAL EAGLE   Kruger NP
LONG-CRESTED EAGLE   Dlinza Forest
WAHLBERG'S EAGLE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
TAWNY EAGLE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
GABAR GOSHAWK   Kruger NP
AFRICAN MARSH-HARRIER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BLACK HARRIER   Wakkerstroom
SHIKRA   Kruger NP
LITTLE SPARROWHAWK   Dlinza Forest
BLACK GOSHAWK   Mkhuze Game Reserve
Black Kite   Teza
AFRICAN FISH-EAGLE   iSimangaliso
COMMON BUZZARD   Mpumalanga
KORI BUSTARD   Kruger NP
WHITE-BELLIED BUSTARD   Eastvaal District Council
BLUE BUSTARD   Wakkerstroom
RED-CRESTED BUSTARD   Kruger NP
BLACK-BELLIED BUSTARD   Mkhuze Game Reserve
AFRICAN RAIL   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
BLACK CRAKE   Kruger NP
AFRICAN SWAMPHEN   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
EURASIAN MOORHEN   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RED-KNOBBED COOT   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
WATER THICK-KNEE   iSimangaliso
SPOTTED THICK-KNEE   iSimangaliso
Black-winged Stilt   St. Lucia
Pied Avocet   St. Lucia
BLACKSMITH LAPWING   Muzi Pan
WHITE-HEADED LAPWING   Kruger NP
CROWNED LAPWING   Mkhuze Game Reserve
WATTLED LAPWING   Mkhuze Game Reserve
KITTLITZ'S PLOVER   St. Lucia
COMMON RINGED PLOVER   iSimangaliso
THREE-BANDED PLOVER   St. Lucia
WHITE-FRONTED PLOVER   St. Lucia
GREATER PAINTED-SNIPE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
LESSER JACANA   Mkhuze Game Reserve
AFRICAN JACANA   iSimangaliso
Ruddy Turnstone   St. Lucia
Ruff   St. Lucia
Curlew Sandpiper   St. Lucia
LITTLE STINT   St. Lucia
AFRICAN SNIPE   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
COMMON SANDPIPER   St. Lucia estuary
COMMON GREENSHANK   Mkhuze Game Reserve
MARSH SANDPIPER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
WOOD SANDPIPER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SMALL BUTTONQUAIL   Mkhuze Game Reserve
COLLARED PRATINCOLE   iSimangaliso
Gray-hooded Gull   St Lucia--bridge
Caspian Tern   St Lucia--bridge
Whiskered Tern   Mkhuze Game Reserve
GREAT CRESTED TERN   St. Lucia
DOUBLE-BANDED SANDGROUSE   Kruger NP
Rock Pigeon   Protea Hotel
SPECKLED PIGEON   Protea Hotel
RAMERON PIGEON   Dlinza Forest
DELEGORGUE'S PIGEON   Dlinza Forest
MOURNING COLLARED-DOVE   Kruger NP
RED-EYED DOVE   Protea Hotel
RING-NECKED DOVE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
LAUGHING DOVE   Protea Hotel
EMERALD-SPOTTED WOOD-DOVE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
NAMAQUA DOVE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
AFRICAN GREEN-PIGEON   Kruger NP
LIVINGSTONE'S TURACO   St. Lucia
KNYSNA TURACO   Ndiza Inn, St Lucia
PURPLE-CRESTED TURACO   Eshowe
GRAY GO-AWAY-BIRD   Kruger NP
WHITE-BROWED COUCAL   St. Lucia
DIDERIC CUCKOO   Mkhuze Game Reserve
KLAAS'S CUCKOO   Kruger NP
AFRICAN EMERALD CUCKOO   Dlinza Forest
BLACK CUCKOO   Kruger NP
RED-CHESTED CUCKOO   Dlinza Forest
AFRICAN GRASS-OWL   Wakkerstroom
Barn Owl   Kruger NP
AFRICAN SCOPS-OWL   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SPOTTED EAGLE-OWL   Mkhuze Game Reserve
PEARL-SPOTTED OWLET   Kruger NP NP
FIERY-NECKED NIGHTJAR   iSimangaliso
SQUARE-TAILED NIGHTJAR   Kruger NP
Alpine Swift   Mpumalanga
LITTLE SWIFT   St Lucia--bridge
HORUS SWIFT   Mkhuze Game Reserve
WHITE-RUMPED SWIFT   Protea Hotel
AFRICAN PALM-SWIFT   Protea Hotel
SPECKLED MOUSEBIRD   Protea Hotel
RED-FACED MOUSEBIRD   Mkhuze Game Reserve
NARINA TROGON   Dlinza Forest
Eurasian Hoopoe   iSimangaliso
GREEN WOODHOOPOE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
COMMON SCIMITARBILL   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SOUTHERN GROUND-HORNBILL   Kruger NP
CROWNED HORNBILL   St. Lucia
AFRICAN GRAY HORNBILL   Kruger NP
SOUTHERN YELLOW-BILLED HORNBILL   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SOUTHERN RED-BILLED HORNBILL   Kruger NP
TRUMPETER HORNBILL   Eshowe--Birds of Paradise B&B
MALACHITE KINGFISHER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
AFRICAN PYGMY-KINGFISHER   iSimangaliso
BROWN-HOODED KINGFISHER   iSimangaliso
STRIPED KINGFISHER   Kruger NP
GIANT KINGFISHER   Outside Waakerstroom
PIED KINGFISHER   iSimangaliso
WHITE-FRONTED BEE-EATER   Kruger NP
LITTLE BEE-EATER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
European Bee-eater   Mkhuze Game Reserve
LILAC-BREASTED ROLLER   Kruger NP
RUFOUS-CROWNED ROLLER   Kruger NP
CRESTED BARBET   Mkhuze Game Reserve
WHITE-EARED BARBET   Eshowe
YELLOW-RUMPED TINKERBIRD   Eshowe
PIED BARBET   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BLACK-COLLARED BARBET   iSimangaliso
LESSER HONEYGUIDE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BENNETT'S WOODPECKER   Kruger NP
GOLDEN-TAILED WOODPECKER   Kruger NP
CARDINAL WOODPECKER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BEARDED WOODPECKER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
LANNER FALCON   Kruger NP
BROWN-HEADED PARROT   Kruger NP
BLACK-THROATED WATTLE-EYE   A1147 Rd Kwazulu-Natal
WOODWARD'S BATIS   iSimangaliso
CHINSPOT BATIS   Mkhuze Game Reserve
WHITE HELMETSHRIKE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RETZ'S HELMETSHRIKE   Kruger NP
BRUBRU   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BLACK-BACKED PUFFBACK   iSimangaliso
BLACK-CROWNED TCHAGRA   iSimangaliso
BROWN-CROWNED TCHAGRA   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SOUTHERN TCHAGRA   Dlinza Forest
SOUTHERN BOUBOU   Dlinza Forest
SULPHUR-BREASTED BUSHSHRIKE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
FOUR-COLORED BUSHSHRIKE   iSimangaliso
GRAY-HEADED BUSHSHRIKE   Mkhuze Game Reserve
GRAY CUCKOOSHRIKE   Dlinza Forest
BLACK CUCKOOSHRIKE   Kruger NP
SOUTHERN FISCAL   Protea Hotel
MAGPIE SHRIKE   Kruger NP
WHITE-CROWNED SHRIKE   Kruger NP
AFRICAN GOLDEN ORIOLE   Kruger NP P
AFRICAN BLACK-HEADED ORIOLE   Kruger NP
SQUARE-TAILED DRONGO   Dlinza Forest
FORK-TAILED DRONGO   Dlinza Forest
AFRICAN CRESTED-FLYCATCHER   iSimangaliso
AFRICAN PARADISE-FLYCATCHER   Dlinza Forest
CAPE CROW   Eastvaal District Council
PIED CROW   Protea Hotel
EASTERN NICATOR   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SPIKE-HEELED LARK   Wakkerstroom
SABOTA LARK   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RUDD'S LARK   Wakkerstroom
RUFOUS-NAPED LARK   iSimangaliso
FLAPPET LARK   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RED-CAPPED LARK   Wakkerstroom
LARGE-BILLED LARK   Wakkerstroom
PLAIN MARTIN   Mkhuze Game Reserve
Barn Swallow   iSimangaliso
WHITE-THROATED SWALLOW   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
WIRE-TAILED SWALLOW   St. Lucia estuary
GREATER STRIPED-SWALLOW   Eastvaal District Council
LESSER STRIPED-SWALLOW   St. Lucia
RUFOUS-CHESTED SWALLOW   iSimangaliso
SOUTH AFRICAN SWALLOW   Eastvaal District Council
SOUTHERN BLACK-TIT   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SOMBRE GREENBUL   Dlinza Forest
YELLOW-BELLIED GREENBUL   St. Lucia
TERRESTRIAL BROWNBUL   Dlinza Forest
COMMON BULBUL   Protea Hotel
BLACK-FRONTED BULBUL   Protea Hotel
CAPE CROMBEC   Mkhuze Game Reserve
LITTLE RUSH-WARBLER   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
BAR-THROATED APALIS   St. Lucia
YELLOW-BREASTED APALIS   St. Lucia
RUDD'S APALIS   St. Lucia
GREEN-BACKED CAMAROPTERA   Dlinza Forest
MIOMBO WREN-WARBLER   Kruger NP
RATTLING CISTICOLA   iSimangaliso
LEVAILLANT'S CISTICOLA   Wakkerstroom Wetland Reserve
CROAKING CISTICOLA   Mkhuze Game Reserve
CLOUD CISTICOLA   Wakkerstroom
PALE-CROWNED CISTICOLA   iSimangaliso
WING-SNAPPING CISTICOLA   Mkhuze Game Reserve
TAWNY-FLANKED PRINIA   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BURNT-NECK EREMOMELA   Kruger NP
CAPE WHITE-EYE   Protea Hotel
ARROW-MARKED BABBLER   Kruger NP
DUSKY-BROWN FLYCATCHER   Dlinza Forest
GRAY TIT-FLYCATCHER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
ASHY FLYCATCHER   Ndiza Inn, St Lucia
SOUTHERN BLACK-FLYCATCHER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
BEARDED SCRUB-ROBIN   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RED-BACKED SCRUB-ROBIN   iSimangaliso
WHITE-BROWED ROBIN-CHAT   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RED-CAPPED ROBIN-CHAT   Ndiza Inn, St Lucia
CHORISTER ROBIN-CHAT   Dlinza Forest
SENTINEL ROCK-THRUSH   Wakkerstroom
AFRICAN STONECHAT   Wakkerstroom
BUFF-STREAKED BUSHCHAT   Wakkerstroom
SOUTHERN ANTEATER-CHAT   Eastvaal District Council
MOCKING CLIFF-CHAT   Kruger NP
MOUNTAIN WHEATEAR   Wakkerstroom
CAPPED WHEATEAR   Wakkerstroom
GROUNDSCRAPER THRUSH   Kruger NP
KURRICHANE THRUSH   Mkhuze Game Reserve
KAROO THRUSH   Protea Hotel
WATTLED STARLING   Kruger NP
COMMON MYNA   Protea Hotel
VIOLET-BACKED STARLING   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RED-WINGED STARLING   King Shaka Intl Airport
BLACK-BELLIED STARLING   St. Lucia
BURCHELL'S STARLING   Kruger NP
AFRICAN PIED STARLING   Eastvaal District Council
GREATER BLUE-EARED STARLING   Kruger NP
CAPE STARLING   Eshowe
RED-BILLED OXPECKER   Mkhuze Game Reserve
YELLOW-BILLED OXPECKER   Kruger NP
COLLARED SUNBIRD   St. Lucia
OLIVE SUNBIRD   Dlinza Forest
MOUSE-COLORED SUNBIRD   iSimangaliso
SCARLET-CHESTED SUNBIRD   Kruger NP
NEERGAARD'S SUNBIRD   Mkhuze Game Reserve
MARIQUA SUNBIRD   iSimangaliso
PURPLE-BANDED SUNBIRD   Mkhuze Game Reserve
WHITE-BREASTED SUNBIRD   Mkhuze Game Reserve
CAPE WAGTAIL   Protea Hotel
AFRICAN PIED WAGTAIL   St Lucia--bridge
AFRICAN PIPIT   Wakkerstroom
STRIPED PIPIT   Wakkerstroom
BUSH PIPIT   iSimangaliso
ORANGE-THROATED LONGCLAW   Wakkerstroom
YELLOW-THROATED LONGCLAW   iSimangaliso
CINNAMON-BREASTED BUNTING   Kruger NP
GOLDEN-BREASTED BUNTING   Mkhuze Game Reserve
YELLOW-FRONTED CANARY   St. Lucia
CAPE CANARY   Protea Hotel
House Sparrow   Protea Hotel
CAPE SPARROW   Protea Hotel
SOUTHERN GRAY-HEADED SPARROW   Mkhuze Game Reserve
YELLOW-THROATED PETRONIA   Mkhuze Game Reserve
RED-BILLED BUFFALO-WEAVER   Kruger NP
RED-HEADED WEAVER   Kruger NP
SPECTACLED WEAVER   Eshowe
CAPE WEAVER   Wakkerstroom
AFRICAN GOLDEN-WEAVER   St. Lucia
SOUTHERN BROWN-THROATED WEAVER   St Lucia--bridge
LESSER MASKED-WEAVER   St. Lucia
SOUTHERN MASKED-WEAVER   Protea Hotel
VILLAGE WEAVER   Eshowe
FOREST WEAVER   Dlinza Forest
RED-BILLED QUELEA   Waakerstrom
SOUTHERN RED BISHOP   Waakerstrom
FAN-TAILED WIDOWBIRD   iSimangaliso
LONG-TAILED WIDOWBIRD  Mpumalanga
GROSBEAK WEAVER   iSimangaliso
BLACK-TAILED WAXBILL   St. Lucia
COMMON WAXBILL   Mkhuze Game Reserve
SOUTHERN CORDONBLEU   Mkhuze Game Reserve
GREEN-WINGED PYTILIA   Mkhuze Game Reserve
AFRICAN FIREFINCH   Dlinza Forest
JAMESON'S FIREFINCH   Kruger NP
BLACK-AND-WHITE MANNIKIN   Dlinza Forest
Pin-tailed Whydah   iSimangaliso
VILLAGE INDIGOBIRD   Kruger NP